PIXAR REVEAL TRAILER FOR FANTASY ANIMATION BRAVE

by Laurent Kelly

The Hollywood Reporter have announced that Pixar have released the first trailer for Brave, a fantasy animation about
a scotish princess (Kelly Macdonald) who “inadvertently brings turmoil to her kingdom by defying a sacred custom of the land.” The film will also star scottish outfits such as Craig Ferguson and Billy Connolly.

Its a bit of a generic  “rise to the occasion” trailer and the visuals look disappointingly reminiscent of a computer game but at least they’ve created a certain  amount of intrigue  surrounding the plot.

The film will be released  on June 22, 2012 and we will have more updates when appropriate.

 

THE 100 GREATEST FILMS OF ALL TIME – 32: THE BICYCLE THIEVES

by Daniel Suddes

Ladri Di Biciclette (Bicycle Thieves, aka The Bicycle Thief). Directed by:  Vittorio De Sica. Written by: Cesare Zavattini, De Sica, Suso D’Amico, Oreste Biancoli, Adolfo Franci, Gerardo Guerriri. Based on the novel by Luigi Bartolini. Starring: Lamberto Maggiorani, Enzo Staiola, Lianella Carell OSCAR COUNT: 1 (Honorary Award for Best Foreign Film released in the United States).

For a while, this was the film that was on everyone’s mind. It lead to a new genre, was given an honorary Oscar after its release, and was voted the greatest film of all time in the first ever Sight and Sound poll made just three years after its release. But that initial wave of praise rolled back, and is still out somewhere in the middle of the ocean of praise. It slipped to sixth in the next Sight and Sound poll (the top spot was now occupied by mainstay Citizen Kane) and was excluded in the next one. It did place sixth in the 2002 directors’ poll, but has not been on the critics list since its slip in 1962.

Perhaps this is because director De Sica was a one hit wonder. None of his films (with the possible exception of Umberto D) have been as renowned, and some were flat out dismissed by critics. Besides, when the film was released, Italy was still recovering from the destruction of World War II and had yet to rebound. Fellini, who released his first film the next year, became Italy’s new cinematic poster child. De Sica was forever forced to observe the action in Fellini’s massive shadow. Continue reading

THE 100 GREATEST FILMS OF ALL TIME – 34: FIGHT CLUB

by Brek the David

Fight Club (1999) –  Director: David Fincher    Adapted Screenplay: Jim Uhls   Starring: Brad Pitt, Edward Norton, Helena Bonham Carter,  OSCAR COUNT (0)

David Fincher mixes visceral style with disrupted substance in 1999’s Fight Club.  A dystopic look at consumerism, commercialism, capitalism, and how it’s fucked a generation raised without fathers, Fight Club takes us on a journey of a world on the brink, balancing of the precipice of the Abyss.  While the world at large drones on, one man acts the part of Howard Beale in Network.  He’s mad as hell and he’s not going to take this anymore.  This man, however, does more than stick his out the window and yell.

Part of what makes Fight Club so compelling is the dichotomy of the main characters, The Narrator and Tyler Durden.  They start off as the protagonists against the very world in which they live.  The Narrator (Ed Norton) had been a drone just like everyone else until he meets Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt).  They become friends, despite being very different men, and what follows is a spree of mayhem and chaos stemming from their foundation of an underground men’s only fight club whose ultimate goal is to devolve the world back to its primal state so mankind can have a second chance. Continue reading

THE 100 GREATEST FILMS OF ALL TIME – 35: BARTON FINK

by Brek the David

Barton Fink (1991) – Directors and original screenplay: The Coen Brothers  Starring: John Turturro, John Goodman, Judy Davis,  Steve Buscemi,  Michael Lerner, John Mahoney, Jon Polito   OSCAR COUNT (0)

Barton Fink: LOOK UPON ME!  I’LL SHOW YOU THE LIFE OF THE MIND!

I’m not exactly sure what’s going on in that crazy scene where Charlie (John Goodman) guns down those detectives in the hotel.  It seems that there’s no way the hotel can actually be bursting into flames.  One explanation could be that the hotel is Hell.  That seems a bit out there to me, but then Barton Fink is a pretty “out there” film.  It seems much more plausible, though still bizarre, that everything in the hotel is taking place in Barton Fink’s mind.

Charlie is just a part of Barton’s psyche playing out his “revenge” on authority and those in power as he kills these overbearing cops.  It’s probably not a coincidence that the detectives are of German and Italian descent as those were the two nations that made up the European Axis Powers and Barton Fink is set in the WWII era.  Charlie is also that part of Barton that holds all the keys to him being a successful and prolific writer.  Since Barton wants to tell the story of the common man, he need to look no further than Charlie to unlock this.  Yet Barton never actually listens to Charlie. Continue reading